USING A DIGITAL CAMERA TO CAPTURE IMAGES OF GENEALOGY
BOOKS, MICROFILMS, MICROFICHE AND TOMBSTONES


HINTS and SUGGESTIONS

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CAMERA
You should have a megapixel camera with at least 6.0 megapixels.

It should have a LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) screen for reviewing the images you capture.

It would be very wise to buy a camera with battery or batteries that can be recharged.

Have an extra "flash (memory) card".

If possible, place your forefinger on the camera button and thumb on the bottom of the camera and "squeeze off" each "shot".

Suggest you use a tripod for "move proofing" the camera when capturing images.

If you are not using a tripod, then lock your elbows and hold them against your chest, take a deep breath, hold it and quickly "squeeze off" a "shot".

Use "fine" or best resolution.

Use color to capture all images.

Get as close to the subject as possible and "frame" the subject very tightly in viewfinder or LCD screen.

Keep the LCD screen turned off most of the time. It drains the batteries Big Time.

Try to use the AC power adapter to learn the camera, downloading images and whenever possible to save the battery or batteries.

Do not mix batteries in your camera from different packages or manufacturers when more than one battery is require.

BOOKS
Using the flash might "burn" or reflect too much light off the paper. You might have to cancel the flash.

Look at Web site http://www.ulead.com/learning/dphoto12/page1.htm

MICROFILM AND MICROFICHE
Turn off the camera flash to capture these light images.

When viewing microfilm images on a reader that has the image projected onto a white board, a white spot and a halo of light is projected on the board. The spot and halo will ruin the captured image in the digital camera. Suggest you move the camera from a perpendicular or 90-degree angle to maybe a 60-degree angle until the spot and most of the halo are gone from the camera viewfinder.

An image may also be obtained for microfilm or microfiche when it is placed in a reader/printer that has the image viewed on a glass screen and then the image may be captured with your camera.

Using a tripod is strongly suggested.

RECORDING TOMBSTONES
Look at Web site http://www.interment.net/column/records/digital/digital.htm

DIGITAL CAMERA WEB SITES
http://www.shortcourses.com/

http://www.rideau-info.com/photos/genealogy-home.html

http://www.dcresource.com/faq/faq.html

http://www.tawbaware.com/

http://support.radioshack.com/support_tutorials/audio_video/digvid-3.htm

http://www.steves-digicams.com/microdrive.html

http://www.mediachance.com/digicam/

http://www.flash-memory-store.com/san25comcar.html

MANAGING AND EDITING YOUR IMAGES
The Presto! Mr.Photo program is great for managing, editing and printing your images. I use the version 1.5 that I get with my digital camera. The version 3 can be downloaded free at: http://www.ict.schools.nt.gov.au/softbank/software/presto_mr_photo3.shtml at upper right from "Support Material". I don't know if it only good for 30 days and than will cost $39.95 or ?.

A collection of free graphics programs is at: http://www.freebielist.com/graphicsprograms.htm Another collection of is at : http://www.shortcourses.com/

ARCHIVING THE IMAGES FROM DIGITAL CAMERAS
There are severe problems archiving for many years the images from digital cameras. It is possibly to have a life of 100 to 300 years if stored on a DVD or CD if you want to try to have future generations use your 200 year computer, DVD or CD drive and the DVD or CD.

To archive photos printed on a present day printer that will not fade and change color in only a few years, it will be necessary to use newly developed "lightfast" or pigment ink from Epson and archival paper. You should store the printed material in a dark environment and under 70 degrees F.

Use the original JPG images from the your camera as your archival copies.

Archiving the digital images on CDs or DVDs is only safe for the life of the CD or DVD which is approximately 300 (CD) or 100 (DVD) years according to the latest studies for gold media. You must buy the very best CD or DVD blanks such as Mitsui (MAM-A) Gold CD-R or DVD-R or Kodak Gold Ultima on eBay. You SHOULD NOT use rewriteable ones. ID and date the CDs or DVDs using only CD or DVD approved marking pens. Store the CDs and DVDs in good cases and vertically. Also store them below 65 degrees F and out of direct sunlight.

CD and DVD WEBSITES
http://www.silverace.com/dottyspotty/issue12.html for CDs and http://www.mam-a.com/ for CDs and DVDs.

ARCHIVING IMAGES WEB SITE
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hd-back.shtml

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Revised 12 February 2014.
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